Stalking Prevention

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FACSAFoundation.org Stalking Prevention

Stalking affects millions of people each year, yet is highly underreported. Stalking is directed at an individual or group of individuals over a specified time to cause emotional fear, harassment, physical or psychological damage. President Obama declared January as National Stalking Awareness Month.

Like many crimes, education, awareness, and prevention are crucial to the survival of an individual. It is imperative to report someone stalking you, even if you feel compelled to brush it off and think it is nothing. If something does happen, you want to make sure it is recorded on file; keeping a journal of events is helpful as well.

According to the United States Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which released its first National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS), reported stalking is a serious issue. NISVS data shows that:

  • Nearly one in      six women has experienced stalking so severe that she felt very fearful      or believed that she or someone close to her would be harmed or killed.
  • One in 19 men      has experienced the same level of stalking.
  • Women were      particularly likely to be stalked by a current or former intimate partner.

Stalking behaviors can include seemingly innocuous acts, such as making unwanted phone calls; sending unsolicited or unwanted letters or emails; or leaving unwanted items, presents or flowers, but when taken together, and when feared by the victim, may constitute a criminal act. Other forms of stalking include following or spying on the victim; showing up without a legitimate reason at places where the victim is likely to be; waiting at places for the victim; and posting information or spreading rumors about the victim on the internet, in a public place, or by word of mouth.

Newer technologies, such as text messaging, emails, and electronic monitoring devices (including cameras and GPS), are also used by perpetrators to stalk victims. Stalking is also frequently a precursor to much more serious, and sometimes lethal, acts. In fact, 76 percent of female intimate partner murder victims had been stalked by their partners prior to their death.

The Stalking Resource Center provides training and technical l assistance to enhance responses to stalking and is committed to collecting the best knowledge about stalking, including researching policy and tracking program success.

According to Louisiana Stalking Laws:

Stalking Defined as

Willful, malicious, and repeated following or harassing with   intent to place in fear of death or bodily injury.

Punishment/Classification

Maximum 1 year jail and $1000 fine. If had dangerous weapon:   fine $1,000 and/or jail 1 year. If stalking and protective order for same   victim, or criminal proceeding for stalking victim or injunction: jail 90   days minimum and 2 years maximum and/or fined maximum $5,000. If victim under   18, maximum 1 year and/or $2000 fine. Note: anyone over 13 who stalks a child   12 and under and is found to have placed child in reasonable fear of death or   bodily injury of family member shall be punished by 1 year minimum, 3 years   maximum in jail and/or $1,500 minimum, $5,000 maximum fine

Penalty for Repeat Offense

If 2nd within 7 years: jail minimum 180 days and maximum 3   years and/or fined maximum $5,000. If 3rd or subsequent within 7 years: jail   minimum 2 years and maximum 5 years and/or fined maximum $5,000

For more information, please visit the Stalking Awareness Month website at: http://stalkingawarenessmonth.org.

For more information about the Office on Violence Against Women, visit ovw.usdoj.gov. We remind all those in need of assistance, or other concerned friends and individuals, to call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 1-800-799-SAFE FREE  end_of_the_skype_highlighting or the National Sexual Assault Hotline at 1-800-656-HOPE begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 1-800-656-HOPE FREE  end_of_the_skype_highlighting.

Connie Lee/FACSA Foundation/ Founder/President

(318)540-4464 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting (318)532-0703 FREE end_of_the_skype_highlighting

FACSAFoundation.org

http://facsafoundationvirtualexpo.ning.com/

http://law.findlaw.com/state-laws/stalking/louisiana/

http://blogs.usdoj.gov/blog/archives/1797

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